DEATH IN THE CAPITOL-CHAPTER XXIII

It is hard to believe that not one person outside Bill McIntosh’s circle, knew or understood what he was doing. As carefully as he could, he developed an organization that, for all intents and purposes did not exist anywhere but in the minds of the members. Who would have thought that this manner of aggregating members and keeping them from disclosing their very existence, could work?

It worked beyond even the imagining of Bill McIntosh. Somehow, he had hit a raw nerve in this country. The people who followed him agreed wholeheartedly with what he was doing. Each of them in turn created their own similar organizations within their own states. There were 50 operating Sons of Liberty, all associated with McIntosh by the early 1970’s. They had taken no action before that time. They were involved in creating a functioning and free form entity that needed no formal structure other than the minds of the members.

McIntosh kept communications going by the simple expedient of phone calls and visits. By the time that the organization needed the organizer to travel across the country, McIntosh had made sufficient money in business and through an inheritance to become independent. He was therefore able to purchase whatever he needed to keep the organization going.

He also found it advantageous to understand that many of the members were either in the upper middle class or above. There were quite a number of captains of industry who had become quite wealthy themselves as time went on. Funds for operations were still put into local banks below the federal limit for observation. By the time 1975 arrived the funds were in hundreds of banks, most of them small and local.

1975 was a signal year for the Sons of Liberty. Bill McIntosh welcomed his first child, Bill Jr. His wife, who had no knowledge of his activities doted on her son. Bill was not quite the fatherly type. He understood that a time would come when he would become too old to head up the Sons of Liberty and that he might have some feeling of letting his son take over. However, that was long in the future. There was much work to do before that.

The first attempt at launching a real activity came in a local election to a school board seat in a rural county in Minnesota. With the candidate being one of the Sons of Liberty, the Minnesota branch was careful not to run rampant in trying to elect one of its members. There were four seats available on the board and 6 candidates. The Son’s candidate, with the help of his organization, used a shotgun approach to the campaign. They looked at all of the ways of contacting voters, from phones to newspapers and also person appearances. They used mostly small amounts of cash to buy things that they needed and did it out of town for the most part. The candidate won over all of the other five candidates my hundreds of votes. Their first outing was a success. It was a harbinger of what they might do in the future.

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